Nnamdi Ebo | NewsBlog

In my NewsBlog Nnamdi Ebo, I provide perspectives on news, events and analysis of unique stories, and I also offer original content, articles and photos; with contributions from some of the best minds.

Nnamdi Ebo | NewsBlog

In my NewsBlog Nnamdi Ebo, I provide perspectives on news, events and analysis of unique stories, and I also offer original content, articles and photos; with contributions from some of the best minds.

Nnamdi Ebo | NewsBlog

In my NewsBlog Nnamdi Ebo, I provide perspectives on news, events and analysis of unique stories, and I also offer original content, articles and photos; with contributions from some of the best minds.

Nnamdi Ebo | NewsBlog

In my NewsBlog Nnamdi Ebo, I provide perspectives on news, events and analysis of unique stories, and I also offer original content, articles and photos; with contributions from some of the best minds.

Nnamdi Ebo | NewsBlog

In my NewsBlog Nnamdi Ebo, I provide perspectives on news, events and analysis of unique stories, and I also offer original content, articles and photos; with contributions from some of the best minds.

 

War Cries

Nnamdi Ebo 2 241x300 On Aburi We Stand: Requiem for Aburi AccordBOOKS . There was a Time | By Nnamdi Ebo.

War Cries soon filled everywhere as crowds took to the streets of Enugu, Onitsha, Aba, Owerri, Umuahia, Port Harcourt and other Igbo towns in the Eastern region. People were aggrieved that the Federal government didn’t do anything to stop the mass killing of Inya miri the appellation and designation given to the Igbos by the Hausa/Fulani and other tribes in the whole of the Northern region. The Igbo are highly mobile people and widely dispersed in Nigeria; much like the Jews in diaspora.

They are found in all nooks and crannies of the north buying and selling. As they travelled, they came upon new places with people as their hosts and when someone is tired, he must look for water to drink. The first thing they request of their hosts, according to the legend is: “Please, give me water to drink” which in Igbo language is biko nyem miri ka nwuo. Their northern host communities translated and shortened the request: give me water in Igbo to ‘nyem miri’ but their Hausa phonetics compelled them to say it like this: Inya miri. This became a cognomen of sorts for the Igbo in the northern region of Nigeria from the 1940s-1960s  

At this time of the pogrom; as mentioned above, Major Murtala Mohammed and some northern elements toyed with the idea of pulling out; that is for the north to secede from Nigeria. The news spread like wildfire in the east that the British High Commissioner in Lagos on the prodding of their home government in London advised the north to remain since they had secured power. I must be honest in this storytelling – I heard many easterners expressing their sadness that the north didn’t secede from Nigeria. Even though I was a boy, I couldn’t have minded, really. They had their groundnut pyramids so I was sure they would have survived as an independent nation.

Many easterners wanted the northern exit at the time and some added that the west would have followed suit like Awo declared; even as the east was celebrating the Aburi Accord. This would have left the east to go their way as an independent state; which was alredy brewing in peoples’ minds, anyway! And Nigeria would have been Balkanized accordingly. My only fear was for the minority peoples of the north, east and west. Their miserable lives would have been complicated fully by intimidation, subjugation, tribalism and discrimination from the three regions’ major tribes of the Hausa/Fulani, the Igbos and the Yorubas respectively.

Though I was a boy, I was not unmindful of the existence of the mid-western region of Nigeria in the 1960s. This small and inconsequential region was not reckoned with in the scheme of things as events unfolded in Nigeria. The mid-west was carved up from the west through the political machinations of the NPC/NCNC designed to whittle the political power and influence of the AG in that former area of the west. The creation of the mid-west was given legal and constitutional bite by an arranged plebiscite and Awo lost a sizeable voting population and supporters. Suddenly, I was not enthusiastic about any region breaking away. I surprised myself by rooting for a united and indivisible Nigeria; I was shocked at my change of mind.

As the successful northern counter coupists were told; now, they can lord it over the whole of Nigeria indefinitely, if they so wish. The second wave of killings started again in earnest as northern elements consolidated political power in Lagos after the counter coup that decimated Ibo military officers stationed in Lagos, west and north; especially in the north.  

As Ibo military officers fled in droves back to the east, the northern mob orchestrated another wave of killings. This time, they were more organized, supervised and resolute in new methods of hacking their victims. In major towns and villages of Northern Nigeria, especially Kaduna, Kano, Zaria, Sokoto, Jos, Makurdi, Jalingo, Kafanchan and other towns – including some middle belt areas of northern Nigeria, the Igbos lost everything as they fled the region. As they did so and returned to the east, the population of the eastern region swelled considerably threatening available resources. People had to accommodate and provide for returning relations.  

The returnees told stories of atrocities and mayhem that befell the Igbos including supposed nice neighbors that turned on their fellow neighbors and killed them. Even some northerners who hid Igbos in their houses were attacked by their own people prompting many to squeal and expose the Igbos in hiding who were trapped. Biafra officials stated that of the 30,000 Easterners massacred in 1966, some 10,000 were non-Ibos and of the 2 million who were forced to return home, nearly 480,000 were non-Ibos.

To be continued 

_________________________________________________________________________________________

There Was A Time . Book Cover 01. 202x300 On Aburi We Stand: Requiem for Aburi AccordCulled from: THERE WAS A TIME | Author: Nnamdi Ebo  |  Published by africagenda Publications  
ISBN: 978-978-50804-3-8  | 1st Edition 2013
Buy the book, THERE WAS A TIME |  Click  Bookshop
Nnamdi Ebo | [email protected]  
© 2015 Nnamdi Ebo . All Rights Reserved

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